A sex-discrimination lawsuit by two former female employees of data storage giant EMC describes a men’s locker-room atmosphere at the firms sales offices and alleges women were systematically denied equal pay and forced to accompany men on company-paid strip club visits.

A sex-discrimination lawsuit by two former female employees of data storage giant EMC describes a men's locker-room atmosphere at the firms sales offices and alleges women were systematically denied equal pay and forced to accompany men on company-paid strip club visits. 2

Data storage giant EMC is facing allegations of sex discrimination by more than 40 women who worked at the company.

A sex-discrimination lawsuit by two former female employees of EMC describes a men’s locker-room atmosphere at the firms sales offices and alleges women were systematically denied equal pay and forced to accompany men on company-paid strip club visits.

A hearing has been scheduled in a bid to include all women who worked in sales at EMC from 2001 to 2004.

More than 40 women have alleged sex-discrimination by EMC in lawsuits, affidavits or complaints with the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, said plaintiffs’ attorney Linda D. Friedman.

EMC’s top executive sent his more than 33,000 employees a letter defending his company after The Wall Street Journal published an article about the discrimination cases.

Joe Tucci, the president, chairman and chief executive, said EMC “strongly” disputes the allegations and believes they “have no legal basis.

“More importantly, they bear no resemblance to the work environment and broad opportunities that have long existed for EMC employees around the world,” Mr Tucci wrote.

The suit was filed in the federal court in Chicago in June 2004 by Tami Remien and Debra Fletcher, formerly of EMC’s Chicago sales office.

Scroll to Top