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One of the authors claiming Dan Brown’s bestseller The Da Vinci Code copied his ideas has admitted he exaggerated his case in an interview with a journalist.

One of the authors claiming Dan Brown's bestseller The Da Vinci Code copied his ideas has admitted he exaggerated his case in an interview with a journalist.  3

Michael Baigent had said 15 points central to the plot of Mr Brown’s novel were from a 1982 non-fiction book Mr Baigent wrote with two other authors.

Mr Baigent and Mr Leigh claim Mr Brown “relied heavily” on their work, The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail. The book’s third author, Henry Lincoln, is not involved in the case.

Random House, which published both books, has denied the allegation.

As the case resumed at the High Court in London, however, Mr Baigent said his language had been “infelicitous”.

He and co-author Richard Leigh are suing UK publisher Random House.

They have taken the publisher to court for copyright infringement. Mr Brown is expected to take the stand later this week.

BlackBerry users breathed a sigh of relief Friday after the device's parent company, Research In Motion, settled a long-simmering patent dispute that threatened to black out the popular mobile e-mail service.  7

BlackBerry users breathed a sigh of relief Friday after the device’s parent company, Research In Motion, settled a long-simmering patent dispute that threatened to black out the popular mobile e-mail service.

Elements of Mr. Fastow's testimony at the criminal trial of his former bosses appear at odds with other information that has developed in the case, including the sworn statements given in another trial by his former lieutenant, Michael J. Kopper.  8

Elements of Mr. Fastow’s testimony at the criminal trial of his former bosses appear at odds with other information that has developed in the case, including the sworn statements given in another trial by his former lieutenant, Michael J. Kopper.