WASHINGTON, Nov. 30 LAWFUEL – Law News, Law Jobs Network…

WASHINGTON, Nov. 30 LAWFUEL – Law News, Law Jobs Network — Americans who pick up a copy of
this week’s U.S. News & World Report will see the latest tongue-in-cheek
advertisement from the nonprofit Center for Consumer Freedom (CCF). The
full- page ad highlights the financial motivation behind many food and
beverage lawsuits and exposes the trial lawyers pushing them. The ad can be viewed online at http://www.LawsuitAddiction.com.

Center for Consumer Freedom senior research analyst J. Justin Wilson
said, “Americans will be shocked to know how often trial lawyers are behind
the push to regulate what they eat. Whether the debate is over fast food,
soda advertisements, or fish, if you scratch the surface you’ll find
millions of dollars on the line for activist trial lawyers trying to cash
in on bloated food fears.”

In the ad, the “law firm” of Shakem Downe & Bolt offers to sue for
addictions to everything from the caffeine in coffee and the low prices at
Wal-Mart to the deals on E-bay and holiday food. With the promise that “we don’t get paid till you do,” the ad vows big money in return for your suffering.

The ad is a light look at an increasingly serious problem. Whether
suing restaurants for their customers’ obesity, attacking soda companies,
or trying to ban trans fat in foods, activists and their trial lawyer
friends in the NGO community have declared all-out war on personal
responsibility and common sense. Our ad shows that these suits are little
more than get-rich-quick schemes for people with law degrees.

Wilson continued, “Trial lawyers will take on any cause, no matter how
frivolous, if they think there’s a buck to be made. Our ad reminds
Americans that money is the driving force behind these ridiculous
lawsuits.”
View the ad and learn more about trial lawyer sharks at
http://www.LawsuitAddiction.com.

The Center for Consumer Freedom is a nonprofit coalition supported by
restaurants, food companies, and consumers, working together to promote
personal responsibility and protect consumer choices.

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