in ,

The Law 100: White & Case Rule

Raking up $1.5 billion in gross revenues is no mean achievement. Nor is $2 million in profits per partner. Nor is $800,000 in revenues per lawyer. Those are the figures that Am Law Daily is reporting in the Am Law 100/200 review.

For the first time, the firm reached $1.5 billion in gross revenue, $2 million in profits per partner and $800,000 in revenue per lawyer. Profits per partner recorded a particularly robust bump of 7.2 percent, from $1.87 million in 2013. Over three years, PPP jumped 36 percent, from under $1.5 million to just over $2 million.

AmLaw Daily reports: “This is the culmination of what we’ve been doing for the past five years,” says White & Case chairman Hugh Verrier, whose firm embarked on a major reorganization in 2009.

Verrier adds that the firm met its goals of boosting profitability and productivity over the past five years while keeping attorney head count roughly flat.  Verrier says that over the next five years White & Case aims to resume growth while continuing to boost financial performance.

High performing practices last year, Verrier says, included antitrust, arbitration, capital markets, private equity and restructuring. White & Case’s best-performing offices were in London, Paris and Washington, D.C., as well as the firm’s smaller offices in Europe and the Middle East.

Among the litigation highlights of 2014 was the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirming a patent ruling that preserved the exclusive right of White & Case client Pfizer to sell the blockbuster anti-seizure drug Lyrica through 2018.

In some of its biggest deals this year, White & Case advised Zimmer Holdings on its $13.35 billion purchase of the medical device maker Biomet, a Chinese consortium on its $6 billion purchase of the Las Bambas copper project in Peru and Dynegy on its $6.25 billion acquisition of 21 power plants across New England and the Midwest.

Read more at American Lawyer

Quarles & Brady Holds Open House for New Indianapolis Office

How Lawyers Can Avoid a Social Media Nightmare