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Minter Ellison Rudd Watts partner, Graham Mouat, has relocated to Mint…

Minter Ellison Rudd Watts partner, Graham Mouat, has relocated to Minter Ellison’s Brisbane office in Australia.

A banking and finance specialist, Graham has worked with both offshore financial institutions and New Zealand companies and financial institutions on a range of complex financial transactions. He has advised on transactions involving commercial paper programmes, subordinated bond issues, securitisation, syndicated lending, and acquisition and property finance.

Graham also has significant project, asset and structured finance experience. He has worked on deals involving power generation, waste water treatment and geothermal plants as well as cross-border and domestic leasing of technology, mining and hospital equipment, railway stock, shipping vessels, aircraft and other movable assets. He also acted for numerous offshore financial institutions on structured finance transactions with New Zealand financial institutions.

Graham is a prolific author, including of chapters in the New Zealand Butterworths Forms and Precedents (“Guarantees”; “Bills of Exchange” and “Credit and Finance”) and of the chapter “Securitisation and Asset Financing across New Zealand’s Borders” in International Asset Securitisation and Other Financing Tools (2000 Transnational Publishers). He also wrote the chapters “Banking” and “Guarantees and the Corporate Benefit Test” in Dimensions Business Finance Law (1992).

A former corporate counsel for Standard Chartered Bank (project finance division) and Barclays Bank (leasing division) in South Africa, Graham also worked for a major law firm in Hong Kong before moving to New Zealand in 1989.

Minter Ellison’s Brisbane Finance Group head, Gillian Brown, said Graham’s arrival would add further depth to the Brisbane team. “Given Queensland’s growing economy and current focus on infrastructure, Graham’s experience in infrastructure and structured finance will be particularly valuable.”

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