The judge who sentenced Paris Hilton to jail and the city’s top prosecutor objected Thursday to her early release for an unspecified medical condition after only three days behind bars. What does it say about judicial process . . and fame?

The judge who sentenced Paris Hilton to jail and the city's top prosecutor objected Thursday to her early release for an unspecified medical condition after only three days behind bars. What does it say about judicial process . . and fame? 2

The judge who sentenced Paris Hilton to jail and the city’s top prosecutor objected Thursday to her early release for an unspecified medical condition after only three days behind bars.

“The judicial process may have been improperly circumvented in this case,” said City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo. “This explanation is puzzling. Los Angeles County jail medical facilities are well-equipped to deal with medical situations involving inmates.”

Sheriff Lee Baca released Hilton to serve 40 days at her Hollywood Hills home after she served three days of what was expected to be a three week stay for violating probation in a reckless driving case.

While Baca’s spokesman said the judge who sentenced her had been consulted, he didn’t mention that Superior Court Judge Michael T. Sauer objected to her release. When Sauer sentenced her last month he specifically said she could not do her time at home.

“He did not agree to the terms of release that the sheriff proposed,” said Superior Court spokesman Allan Parachini.

But Sheriff’s Department spokesman Steve Whitmore noted it’s not unusual for inmates to finish sentences under home confinement.

The overcrowded jail system frequently releases inmates early after serving only a fraction of their sentences.

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