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With jury selection set to begin Monday, the judge in Michael Jackson’s child-molestation case is still considering whether the entertainer’s accuser should testify in public and whether jurors should see a British documentary about the pop star.

With jury selection set to begin Monday, the judge in Michael Jackson’s child-molestation case is still considering whether the entertainer’s accuser should testify in public and whether jurors should see a British documentary about the pop star.

Superior Court Judge Rodney Melville scheduled a pretrial hearing for Friday to address those and other questions related to witnesses and evidence.

Jackson, 46, has pleaded not guilty to charges of molesting a 13-year-old boy and plying him with alcohol.

Jury selection could last as long as a month, with the judge and attorneys for both sides expected to screen as many as 750 prospective jurors.

Prosecutors want to close the courtroom to the media and public when the boy, now 15, and his 14-year-old brother testify. Reporters would be allowed to hear their voices through an audio feed.

The boy making the accusations against Jackson already has been seen in the documentary, which aired on ABC-TV in 2003 and contains footage of the two holding hands and Jackson defending his practice of sleeping in the same bed with children.

Prosecutors want the jury to see the documentary. Defense lawyers object, denouncing it as “heavily edited in the most sensational fashion possible

British MP George Galloway and his opponent the Daily Telegraph will leave no stone unturned to sort out what could be a spectacular libel case.

One of the authors claiming Dan Brown’s bestseller The Da Vinci Code copied his ideas has admitted he exaggerated his case in an interview with a journalist.