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“Why I Quit Law To Become a Porn Star”

When judging whether a law job is the job you really want, you’ll doubtless gauge the various options: teaching, banking, business – but what of pornography, for instance?

Which is precisely what English law student Ella Hughes decided after making waves online, so to speak, with her pornographic acting. Her first video achieved over 4 million hits.

It brings to mind the story we reported on former Brazilian constitutional lawyer Claudia di Marchi who quit law to become a high class prostitute.

According to Twitter, won Female Performer of the Year — spent a year pursuing her law degree in England while also taking her first steps into the world of pornographic acting:

I always thought I’d be a lawyer, but when I was in my first year of studying law at university, things changed. I was working so hard – in lectures from 9am to 7pm every day – that I couldn’t find a way to earn money. I didn’t really need the money – I had a student loan – but I hate depending on people and always wanted my own money.

Hughes says she earns earns “between £500 to £1,000 for a shoot” and a shoot lasts about 20 minutes, which is quite a good billable hour in legal terms.

Sex-Life Balance

Getting some balance into her life – personal and professional – was one of the key considerations she gave to her career choice.

As she told the BBC, “I did it for a year alongside my degree, but I was really struggling to balance it all, and my university professors eventually found out. They told me law and porn don’t mix – that law is a degree for respectable people and I might not be seen that way with my profile online as a porn star. I had to decide whether I wanted to stay or not.

I chose porn.

The job has given her money, freedom, travel opportunities and also fulfilled her desire to actually do something she enjoys, which she was unsure law could ever do for her.

Difficult Decision

Despite the money and her growing popularity, the decision was not an easy one.  But ultimately it came down to money and her love of what she does.

 I realised that by the time I finished my bar exams, I could have bought myself a house and car from doing porn.

The recognition in the street is a problem, as you might expect of a porn star.

She’s also had problems with stalkers, as you also do as a porn star.  Currently she has her own legal proceeding in respect of one stalker.

She also rejects the stigma around porn and claims that as a feminist porn has permitted her sexuality to thrive.

“I’m using it to own advantage to get through life.

I don’t think I’ll ever move out of the industry – and I don’t believe I have a shelf life. There are women doing amazingly as GILFs, and though I doubt I’ll do that, I want to keep going til I’m financially stable. I’m hoping that when I get my website set up, I’ll keep earning revenue from it after I quit.

Honestly? I just can’t imagine a life without porn anymore.

But as a career choice for lawyers?  Another to add to the mix, after all there are precedents for this, along with those with legal degrees who do just about every other job under the sun.

 

 

 

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