SAN FRANCISCO – LAWFUEL – The Law Newswire – United States Attorney …

SAN FRANCISCO – LAWFUEL – The Law Newswire – United States Attorney Scott N. Schools announced that Maleka May was charged today with making false statements to federal agents at San Francisco International Airport on April 23, 2007 and May 3, 2007. This charge is the result of an investigation by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and Customs and Border Protection.

Maleka May, 37, traveled to and from China through San Francisco International Airport on April 23, 2007 and May 3, 3007. According to the criminal complaint, Ms. May is alleged to have made false statements to federal agents when they questioned her at the airport about her activities in China and contacts with her husband, Kenneth Freeman. Kenneth Freeman is an Immigration and Customs Enforcement Top Ten Fugitive and a U.S. Marshals Service Top Fifteen Fugitive wanted on multiple counts of child rape, and for manufacturing, possessing, and distributing child pornography. After Kenneth Freeman was released on a bail bond, he became a fugitive on or about March 24, 2006, and allegedly has resided primarily in China until he was arrested this week in Hong Kong. The Eastern District of Washington U.S. Attorney’s Office is handling Kenneth Freeman’s federal prosecution.

The criminal complaint against Ms. May alleges that contrary to her statements to federal agents, she has visited Kenneth Freeman in China more than once since he became a fugitive. It further alleges that Kenneth Freeman in fact picked her up when she arrived at the Pudong Shanghai International Airport on April 24, 2007.

Ms. May was arrested on May 3, 2007 at San Francisco International Airport, and was arraigned before United States Magistrate Judge Elizabeth D. Laporte on May 4, 2007. She is in the custody of the United States Marshals Service. A detention hearing before Judge Laporte is set for Monday, May 7, 2007 at 9:30 a.m.

The maximum statutory penalty for making false statements to federal agents in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1001 is five years imprisonment and a $250,000 fine. However, any sentence following conviction would be imposed by the court after consideration of the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and the federal statute governing the imposition of a sentence, 18 U.S.C. § 3553.

A criminal complaint contains only allegations and, as with all defendants, Ms. May must be presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Julie A. Arbuckle is the Assistant U.S. Attorney who is prosecuting the case with the assistance of Rawaty Yim. This prosecution is a result of an investigation by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and Customs and Border Protection.

Further Information:

A copy of this press release may be found on the U.S. Attorney’s Office’s website at www.usdoj.gov/usao/can.

Electronic court filings and further procedural and docket information are available at https://ecf.cand.uscourts.gov/cgi-bin/login.pl.

Judges’ calendars with schedules for upcoming court hearings can be viewed on the court’s website at www.cand.uscourts.gov.

All press inquiries to the U.S. Attorney’s Office should be directed to Natalya LaBauve at (415) 436-7055 or by email at [email protected]

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