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Criminal Law Firm’s iPhone App

An Australian criminal law firm has developed an iPhone app to provide those seeking a quick answer to a criminal law question with a free and – hopefully – useful response.

The Sydney law firm launched its Pocket Lawyer app for iPhone and iPad use, providing basic answers to basic questions without the need for a real lawyer.  Not yet, anyway because the desired intent is presumably for the app-user to go see a lawyer when things get really difficult.

ITWire reports that  to stand out from the crowd, and saying it wants to ‘go the extra mile to help people understand the law and help themselves in a range of situations without having to pay for a lawyer’, the NSW Pocket Lawyer app was born.

Clearly the city-based law firm, which says it practices ‘almost exclusive in criminal law’ also sees an opportunity to have people thinking of it should they need more extensive legal help, thus making it a clever way to get some promotion so as to reel in the big bucks later – should more drastic legal assistance be required.

The company says that it already ‘uses social media platforms such as Facebook, YouTube and Google+ to engage with their clients and the wider community, answer questions and discuss legal issues.’

However, given the fact apps are a happening thing these days, being innovative technology and all that, the company decided it wanted to ‘make the law engaging and accessible to all’, so its app takes things ‘one step further by bringing a whole host of legal information into a handy and easy-to-use app for iPhone and iPad called the ‘NSW Pocket Lawyer app’, calling it ‘a one-stop-shop for information about criminal and traffic laws in NSW.’

You can download the NSW Pocket Lawyer app free from the App Store, with the promise of ‘a wealth of information about the law, legal process and an individual’s rights – all handily accessible on iPhone and iPad.’

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