The “Unsafe at Any Tort” Museum, From Ralph Nader

The 79-year-old Nader says the American Museum of Tort Law, which is set to be built in a former bank building in downtown Winsted, will hold appeal for an audience far beyond law school students. Ralph Nader, the consumer advocate and attorney, as well as political activist, five time presidential candidate and author of various books and articles, plans on building a Museum of Tort Law in his hometown of Winsted, Connecticut. Nader, who has become the face of consumer activism first rose to fame with his book on the automobile industry, “Unsafe at Any Speed”. 

The new museum will celebrate victory of law over corporate power, among other things and will be something of a coming home in more ways than one for the consumer rights warrior, Nader.

The Huffington Post reports that the 79-year-old Nader says the American Museum of Tort Law, which is set to be built in a former bank building in downtown Winsted, will hold appeal for an audience far beyond law school students. He said in an interview with The Associated Press that visitors will learn that the jury system serves ordinary citizens.

“I hope they and their children will see what an awesome institution it is,” he said. “Most people feel excluded from the democratic processes in our country. There’s a lot of cynicism, lethargy, apathy.”

The museum will detail the history of tort law – civil law that seeks relief for people injured by wrongful acts of others – and host exhibits on significant cases such as the 1998 national settlement with tobacco companies. Nader said it may also host artifacts including a Chevrolet Corvair – the car featured in his 1965 book on the auto industry’s safety record, “Unsafe at Any Speed,” which made him a household name.

Among those unlikely to visit is Darren McKinney, a spokesman for the American Tort Reform Association, which backs efforts to curb what it says are excessive lawsuits. He said the museum is unnecessary.

“If Ralph thinks it’s needed, God bless him. This is America,” he said. “I’ll personally find it amusing the first time his museum suffers a slip-and-fall lawsuit. Now that he’s responsible for operating a facility, let’s see how his opinion changes on tort law.”

Nader, who twice ran for president and still works at the nonprofit advocacy organization Public Citizen, has been pursuing the idea for the museum for years only to run into several roadblocks. But he said he has raised about $2 million, a museum design firm has been hired, and renovations are set to begin in the fall. He expects the museum to be established in the next two years.

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