The movie industry is trying a new tactic in its war against people who download pirated copies of films over the Internet – it’s asking nicely.

Movie studios will launch a campaign Tuesday that includes television ads and in-theater spots featuring makeup artists, set painters and other crafts people saying that piracy robs them of a living.

The Motion Picture Association of America has also developed a curriculum on copyrights for use in classrooms by Junior Achievement. The “Digital Citizenship” program covers the history of copyright and culminates with a nationwide contest in which students suggest ways to persuade peers that swapping illegal copies of music and movies is not only illegal, but wrong.

The film and music industries have been aggressive over the past year or so in enforcing their copyrights in the courts as well as lobbying for tougher laws to punish those who swap music and movie files over the Internet.

While copies of popular blockbusters can be found on the Internet – sometimes days before the movie is released to theaters – computer copies of films are still too large to download easily and are often poor quality copies made using hand-held camcorders

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